February 14, 2006

woodshouse

one a my redars was askin me if i read pg wodhose teh othar day an i was like 'no but i read nc-17 woodhouse har har!' liek slyly covaring up not havin a clue. so its wiht great ralief i found worstalls bit about teh wodehouse qooate servar:

She made a sound like a pekingese being hit on the back of the neck with a sack of wet mastodons by a curate, when it had expected a golf ball.

He had the look of a Pekingese discovering a mastodon on a golf course, instead of an Aunt.

As is so often the case with Aunts, the Pekingese had consumed a mastodon, only to bring forth a butler.

The mastondon's Aunt bellowed at the butler, like a curate finding a golf ball in a Pekingese.

so i havant been misign much.

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'S a pity you've not a greater appreciation of Pekes. As to the late Wodehouse, however, I have the following quote: "The beak gave a coldish nod in my direction, as much as to say that they might now strike the fetters from my wrists; and having hitched up the pince-nez once more, proceeded to hand poor old Sippy one of the nastiest looks ever seen in Bosher Street Police Court."
I suppose, Mr. Bogol, Sir, that you may be able to do better than that, and, I hope, you will forgive me for being unable to recall a time during which you have.
 
Excuse me, I thought you said Woodlouse. They are edible, you know, but only barely.
 
Ye gods, C. Bagley, that's most of a paragraph just to say "The beak gave me a tepid nod, hitched up his glasses, and handed poor Sippy an incredibly nasty look."

Arlington does better than that in every post. I mean, say what you will about the prose around here, but at least he doesn't bloat thoughts into 50 words if they need fewer than 20.
 
The last time I hit a Pekingese on the back of the neck with a sack of wet mastodons it didn't make any sound at all, just died, so PG doesn't know what he's talking about. Still like him, though.
 
at least he doesn't bloat thoughts into 50 words if they need fewer than 20

Although, to compensate for the omission, he will frequently ensure that only twenty to fifty per cent of the letters in each word occupy their customary orthographic niches.
 
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